Monthly Archives: June 2019

Council’s conduct complaints the focus of local government conference

ORANGE councillors’ concerns about the cost of code of conduct complaints have received support at the Local Government NSW conference.
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The LGNSW board put forward a motion onTuesday encompassing motions submitted by Orange City, North Sydney and Tenterfield Shire councils, which delegates passed.

Councillor Jason Hamling said the motion asked for councils’ concerns to be taken on board and for the association to come up with possible improvements to refer to the state government.

“Things like penalties for breaches of confidentiality and finding resolutions without referral to a conduct reviewer,” he said.

Orange councillors asked to take the issue to the conference after a series of 24 unfounded complaints were made earlier this year, costing the council more than $26,000 in staff time.

A government information public access (GIPA) request to reveal the complainant’s identity was refused.

Cr Hamling said Local Government Minister Paul Toole also addressed the conference delegates on Tuesday morning, who reiterated Premier Mike Baird’s comments on possible amalgamations on Monday.

“He said he had met with 80 councils and there was a lot of evidence to reform local government and making the changes would strengthen councils financially,” Cr Hamling said.

While Orange ratepayers will vote for the mayor directly at the next election, he said those councils who kept councillor elections could have them reduced to every two years rather than annually to ensure they had a chance to make a difference.

The Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal will pass its Fit for the Future recommendations to Mr Toole on Friday.

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For whom the bell tolls after all these yearsVIDEO

Heather Farnham rings the old Telarah Public School bell.Heather Farnham made ­history for the second time on Tuesday when she rang a special ship’s bell to celebrate the 125th birthday of Telarah Public School.
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The last time Mrs Farnham clanged out a message, it was on the same bell at the same school – to celebrate the end of World War ll.

A Rutherford resident, Mrs Farnham was an 11-year-old pupil then and she notched up another claim to fame: she was the first girl ever to ring the bell at Telarah Public School.

Approaching her 82ndbirthday this Sunday, Mrs Farnham was asked by the school to ring their bell to signal the opening of its 125th birthday celebration yesterday.

“It was such an honour and it brought back so many memories,” the great-grandmother told The Mercury.

“I was only 11 when I was asked to ring the bell at the end of the last war and I still don’t know why I was chosen,” Mrs Farnham said.

“Before this, only the boys had ever rung it – as girls, we were not allowed to touch it.

“I have no doubt some of them were a bit put out that a girl was ringing the bell, but this was one of so many things since then that have changed for women.”

Mrs Farnham said she was aware at her young age that the end of the war was a wonderful thing for so many people and that so many had also suffered.

When the big moment arrived at Telarah Public School yesterday, Mrs Farnham stepped smartly up to the bell and on the command, began whirling the hand wheel which rocked it back and forth.

“It was much easier than the old bell, which had to be rung by pulling hard on a rope,” she said.

“On the day the war ended, I rang that bell as hard as I could, because I knew it was an important occasion.

“And what made it extra special was knowing I had beaten the boys.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Karadoc cuts go ahead

TREASURY Wine Estates, the parent company of Lindeman’s Winery at Karadoc, is moving to a second phase of supply chain optimisation.
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Warehousing and packaging operations at Karadoc will move to the Barossa Valley.

Touted as a “supply chain optimisation” by the company, the consolidation is aimed at removing costs deemed excess to the company’s needs and simplifies its processes, including the sale of vineyards and packaging and warehousing operations.

A statement by TWE said getting rid of assets and making most of each of its facilities and simplifying logistics, warehousing and freight arrangements and reduce costs, would help realise the companya non-cash asset write-down of $20-30 million.

In March, TWE announced Karadoc winery’s warehousing and packaging operations would be moved to the Barossa Valley.

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Public art at dam to get people talking: Photos

Public art at dam to get people talking: Photos Tamborine Mountain sculptor Jacques van der Merwe is pictured with his silky oak and steel creation titled Night Swimming at the Beaudesert and District Community Art Project Lake Wyaralong Sculpture Park.
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Rob Overell and Pietro Agnoletto from the Beaudesert and District Community Art Project help on installation day at the Lake Wyaralong Sculpture Park.

Tamborine Mountain artist Jacques van der Merwe prepares to install his silky oak and steel creation titled Night Swimming.

Pietro Agnoletto and Rob Overell from the Beaudesert and District Community Art Project help on installation day.

Radha Pedersen with his sculpture collection titled Happy Times before installation at the Lake Wyaralong Sculpture Park.

Silvio Apponyi of Adelaide puts the finishing touches on Giant Fishing Rod, a 10-metre work crafted with Kooralbyn spotted gum.

Birgit Grapentin of Laidley supervises while her work Resonance is lifted into place.

Beaudesert and District Community Art Project vice-president Sue Overell and secretary Chris Grimmett at the Lake Wyaralong Sculpture Park installation day.

Tamborine Mountain sculptor Jacques van der Merwe is pictured with his silky oak and steel creation titled Night Swimming at the Beaudesert and District Community Art Project Lake Wyaralong Sculpture Park.

Killarney sculptor Paul Stumkat with his work Water Dragon Skull, which looks towards Mt Joyce over Wyaralong Dam.

Night Swimming is a silky oak and steel sculpture by Tamborine Mountain sculptor Jacques van der Merwe.

Night Swimming is a silky oak and steel sculpture by Tamborine Mountain sculptor Jacques van der Merwe.

Water Dragon Skull by Killarney sculptor Paul Stumkat is transported to be installed atop a hill overlooking Wyaralong Dam.

German sculptor Thomas Riefferscheid crafted a sandstone piece titled Balance.

Beaudesert and District Community Arts Project member Debbie Oberhardt and president Andy Grodecki at the installation day.

Killarney sculptor Paul Stumkat with his work Water Dragon Skull, which looks towards Mt Joyce over Wyaralong Dam.

TweetFacebookNight Swimmingby Tamborine Mountain sculpture Jacques van der Merwe, a compelling metaphor for doing battlewith one’semotions,is one of seven sculptures which form the newLake Wyaralong Sculpture Park.

Mr van der Merwe used Tamborine Mountain silky oak and steel to craft Night Swimmerover two weeks at theWyaralongSculptureFestival andSymposium, which ended on Sunday.

Organisers the Beaudesert and Community Arts Project (BADCAP)had to persistfor permission to install the work because of its nudity but Mr van der Merwe encouraged onlookers to consider its deeper meaning.

“It’s got nothing to do with the fact that he’s nude or not –it’s just a metaphor for when you have a lot of feelings and sometimes you feel like you’re swimming in them,” he said.

“It’s like swimming through that emotion –dealing with your emotions –and I called it night swimming because it’s not always easy.

“It’s kind of a mysterious sculpture in a way –because of the steel bathing cap the sculpture became not just a swimmer but almost like a soldier.”

BalancebyThomas Riefferscheid of Germany, Water DragonbyPaul Stumkat of Killarney, Humming Stone byBirgit Grapentin of Laidley, Spirallel Geometry byLuke Zwolsman of the Gold Coast and Good Times by Radha Pedersen of Victoria Point were also installed on Saturday atop the hill overlooking Wyaralong Dam.

Giant Fishing Rod, a 10-metre work by Adelaide sculptorSilvio Apponi is expected to be installed in the coming week after it receives approval from engineers.

The Lake Wyaralong Sculpture Park is estimated to be worth about $180,000 including in-kind donations.

BADCAP raised most of the money through the annual Arts in the Olives festival in the Lost World Valley and also drew support from the federalRegional Arts Fund, the state Regional Arts Development Fund, Arts Queensland and the Scenic Rim Regional Council.

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Land reform issue lingers

MEMBER for Murray Adrian Piccoli says reform into land locked by Western Lands leases (WLL) and Crown Land freeholds was progressing with the state’s Minister for Primary Industries, Land and Water Niall Blair.
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Wentworth Shire councillor Bob Wheeldon says land locked by government leases and freeholds was hurting the prospects of the New South Wales shire.

“There is a bit of legislative red tape to work through and Wentworth Shire Council will be kept informed of its progress,” he said.

Mr Piccoli further outlined his approach to the 900 lots development stalemate Wentworth Shire Council finds itself in.

“You don’t just approve a lease to freehold land – it’s not a simple process to do across our geographic area and it’s not just about ticking off developments.”

Mr Piccoli said he would continue to work through WLL and Crown Land arrangements with Wentworth Shire in coming weeks.

He said an impending Crown Land White Paper – a document that will help inform New South Wales Government policy when deciding how to protect and release Crown Land – would simplify the process to release freehold land and leases.

However, Wentworth Shire Councillor Bob Wheeldon said the government’s Crown Land White Paper had taken the government since 2012 to work through and it wasn’t yet finished, calling it “slow”.

For more of this story, purchase your copy of Wednesday’s Sunraysia Daily 14/10/2015.To subscribe to our Digital Edition Click here

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.